Sage-Grouse

The Sage-Grouse is the largest grouse in North America. Its range is sagebrush country in the western United States and southern Canada. Their current population is less than 10 percent of historical numbers.

Found only in Colorado, the Gunnison Sage-Grouse was recently (2001) recognized to be a new species separate from the greater sage-grouse. They are about one-third smaller than the greater, and males have more distinct white tail feathers and hair feathers (filoplume).

Greater Sage-Grouse

The Sage-Grouse is the largest grouse in North America. Its range is sagebrush country in the western United States and southern Canada. Their current population is less than 10 percent of historical numbers.

Found only in Colorado, the Gunnison Sage-Grouse was recently (2001) recognized to be a new species separate from the greater sage-grouse. They are about one-third smaller than the greater, and males have more distinct white tail feathers and hair feathers (filoplume).

Gunnison Sage-Grouse

The Gunnison Sage-Grouse, found only in Colorado, was recently (in 2000) realized to be a species separate from the Greater Sage-Grouse.

They are about one-third smaller than the typical sage grouse, and males have more distinct, white tail feathers and hair feathers, filoplume. Females are about one-third smaller than other sage-grouse.  The Gunnison Sage-grouse depend on sagebrush.

Male Gunnison Sage-grouse perform an elaborate display to attract females. They will strut, flap their wings against their white pouches and utter a distinctive series of sounds by vocalizing and popping two air sacs within their pouches.